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Feedback from the Field Drives Release of Information Solution Design, Offerings

From the start, we’ve made feedback from the field—from both customers and prospective customers—an essential part of our Release of Information (ROI) product development process. In our infancy (and maybe even toddlerhood), feedback was gathered using a grassroots approach. 

 

Lead UX Designer Tou Lee says, “I have a cousin who works in ROI, so I’d sometimes tap her for feedback about things that were in development. Or, I’d connect with a parent at a kid’s birthday party and realize they might be a good source of feedback, and I’d ask them if they’d be willing to get together.” In the early days, we took a feedback-by-any-means necessary approach. 

 

As Moxe grew and more team members like Elvira Martinez, Product Manager of Release of Information, joined in our mission, the process to gather inputs from the field to help shape our product design and offerings became more robust and formalized. (We’re still not above asking for feedback at kids’ birthday parties, though.) 

 

The Feedback Loop

It can be hard to believe that when a vendor asks for feedback, it’s not going to go in one ear and out the other. 

 

At Moxe, we take customer and prospective customer feedback and other inputs very seriously. “We design all products and features with input from the field first,” Martinez says. “In order for me to do my job well, customer feedback is essential. I regularly engage in customer calls to gather feedback on the product and join in prospective customer calls to gather information about what they want. Feedback from the field directly informs features we prioritize for development and is imperative to shaping our long-term product strategy.”

 

When working on product design, Martinez and Lee often ask customers to demonstrate how they perform a task today. “We want to understand their pain points. We ask, ‘What do you wish could be better about this workflow?’” Martinez says. 

 

“I like to talk with customers and prospective customers about what they’re struggling with in general, too. Sometimes I’ll get insight into things that might not have been on our current roadmap, but thanks to their feedback, we may then prioritize that feature,” she says. 

 

Feedback from the field directly informs features we prioritize for development and is imperative to shaping our long-term product strategy.

 

Since we’re not designing products for a single customer, Martinez notes the importance of vetting a customer’s insights with others. “Customer A might say, ‘It would be really good if we had X.’ I’ll take that insight and run it by other customers to see if their insights align. If their insights differ, I try to find where the gaps are and how we can offer a solution that best meets our customers’ needs.”

 

Features are tested with customers who give input to see how they resonate with them. “Ultimately, we need to take customer feedback into account because they’re the ones who are going to be using the product,” Lee says. 

 

Although Lee and Martinez are often both on design discovery calls with current and prospective customers, there is a system where all feedback is documented and organized so that feedback that’s received more informally is also taken into account. 

 

“Customer Success Managers, Implementation Specialists, Sales, and others in customer-facing roles often receive organic feedback that’s equally important to document and follow up on,” Martinez says. 

 

With the expansion of our ROI services, we’re thrilled to have recently hired several ROI Specialists, who will provide invaluable feedback from the field thanks to their proximity to the release of information challenges our customers face. 

 

Building a Better ROI Product

Martinez and Lee say that a pain point many customers share is the level of manual effort required to complete the chart redaction process. 

 

With the expansion of our ROI services, we’re thrilled to have recently hired several ROI Specialists, who will provide invaluable feedback from the field thanks to their proximity to the release of information challenges our customers face. 

 

“Our ROI application integrates with our automatic chart retrieval technology, but the product today doesn’t allow for editing of PDFs,” Lee says. Instead, users often print PDFs and then have to manually redact information with a good old-fashioned sharpie. 

 

Thanks to Lee and Martinez’s efforts to gather core needs around customers’ redaction workflows, an in-app chart modification feature is in the works for an upcoming release. 

 

Martinez says customers are excited that this feature will allow them to stay within Moxe’s ROI application to complete their redaction workflows and minimize tedious manual steps. 

 

Shaping the Future of ROI

While 100% of Moxe’s customers report overall satisfaction with our digital ROI solution according to KLAS Research’s Emerging Technology Spotlight performance report, Lee and Martinez say they are always mining for ways to improve what’s offered.

 

“Today, fax is still one of the most common record delivery mechanisms,” Lee says. “Customers are often using an e-faxing software or a physical fax machine to send information where it needs to go.” 

 

“Thanks to input from our customers, we’re looking at how we can include e-faxing as part of our platform and, in general, consolidate requestor communication within the ROI app,” he says. 

 

As we look at how we can continue to best support ROI—reducing unnecessary manual processes and empowering providers to deliver exactly the information that’s needed and nothing more—Martinez and Lee say they are grateful for our customers who are willing to share their feedback to help shape the future of ROI. 

 

If you have feedback to share on our ROI product, please reach out to your Customer Success Manager. Or, if you’re a prospective partner, see how our solution stacks up against the competition. 

 

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